Glycemic Load Chart

Care of : https://www.glycemic-index.org/glycemic-load-chart.html

Glycemic load chart below should be used as a guide to make wiser food choices to perform better all day long and feel better generally by keeping your blood glucose levels relatively constant.

If there is a sudden spike in your blood sugar, your pancreas secretes more insulin, bringing your blood sugar down by transforming the excess sugar to fat. The higher the rate is, the lower your blood sugar will go. Blood glucose being too low means increased hunger and fatigue.

Glycemic index and glycemic load are both about the impact of carbohydrate rich foods on your blood glucose levels or in other words how quick or slow they cause a rise and a fall.

The difference is that glyemic load is based on the idea that a small serving of a high GI food will have the same kind of effect as a big serving of a low GI food. Foods that are mostly water, for instance, will not cause a sudden rise in your blood sugar even if they have high GI values.

 

That’s how they’ve come up with the glycemic load- GL. GL takes into account both the GI value and the quantity of carbohydrate in that food. So it provides a more accurate picture than glycemic index, as you will see on the glycemic load chart below.

Glycemic Load = (Quantity of carbohydrate content x GI ) / 100.

• GL of 20 or more is high, a GL of 11 to 19 is medium and a GL of 10 or less is low.

• A food with a GI of 70 and a carb content of 10g has a GL value of 7.

• A food with a GI of 10 and a carb content of 70g has also a GL value of 7.

Glycemic Load Chart:

Dairy Products:

• Full cream milk — 250ml — 3

• Soy milk — 250ml — 4

• Skimmed milk 250ml — 4

• Semi skimmed milk — 250ml — 4

• Low fat ice cream — 50g — 6

• Low fat fruit yogurt — 200g — 7

• Banana smoothie — 250ml — 8

• Mars flavoured milk — 250ml — 15

Fruits:

• Grapefruit — 120g — 3

• Cherries — 120g — 3

• Peach — 120g — 4

• Watermelon —120g — 4

• Pear — 120g — 5

• Plum — 120g — 5

• Orange — 120g — 5

• Apricot — 120g — 5

• Apple — 120g — 6

• Grapes — 120g — 8

• Banana — 120g — 12

• Sultanas — 60g — 25

• Raisins — 60g — 28

Glycemic load chart below should be used as a guide to make wiser food choices to perform better all day long and feel better generally by keeping your blood glucose levels relatively constant.

Vegetables:

• Broccoli — 80g — 1

• Cabbage — 80g — 1

• Spinach — 80g — 1

• Asparagus — 80g — 1

• Carrot — 80g — 3

• Green peas — 80g — 3

• Broad beans — 80g — 9

• Parsnips — 80g — 12

• Sweet potato — 150g — 17

• Sweet corn — 150g — 17

• Baked potatoes — 150g — 26

Legumes:

• Soy beans — 150g — 1

• Lentils — 150g — 5

• Split peas — 150g — 6

• Baked beans — 150g — 7

• Red kidney beans — 150g — 7

• Garbanzos — 150g — 8

• Romano beans — 150g — 8

• Pinto beans — 150g — 10

• Navy beans — 150g — 12

Grains:

• Barley — 150g — 11

• Bulgur — 150g — 12

• Whole wheat kernels — 50g — 14

• Brown rice — 150g — 18

• Couscous — 150g — 23

• White rice — 150g — 23

Cereals:

• Muesli — 30g — 10

• Porridge — 250g — 12

• Kellogg’s All Bran — 30g — 12

• Swiss muesli — 30g — 13

• Oatmeal — 250g — 13

• Kellogg’s Special K — 30g — 14

• Puffed wheat — 30g — 16

• Instant oatmeal — 250g — 17

• Corn flakes — 30g — 19

• Coco pops — 30g — 20

baguette and tomatoes

Breads:

• Burgen fruit loaf — 30g — 6

• Pumpernickel Bread — 30g — 6

• Barley and sunflower bread — 30g — 6

• Rye bread — 30g — 7

• Rice bread — 30g — 8

• Whole wheat bread — 30g — 9

• White pita bread — 30g — 10

• Baguette — 30g — 10

• White bagel — 30g — 11

Snacks and Beverages:

• Tomato juice — 250ml — 2

• Apple juice — 250ml — 10

• Carrot juice — 250ml — 10

• Banana cake — 80g — 12

• Vanilla wafers — 25g — 14

• Corn tortilla — 60g — 14

• Pepsi — 250ml — 15

• Cranberry juice drink — 250ml — 16

• Sponge cake — 60g — 16

• Rice cakes — 25g — 17

• Snickers bar — 60g — 19

• Fanta — 250ml — 23 

*Foods with low GL values are almost always low in glycemic index too. Those with medium or high GL could be anything- from very low to very high GI.

*You can only see the glycemic load values of foods on the Glycemic Load Chart above, if you would like the glycemic index values as well, please refer to the Glycemic Index Chart, where you can make a comparison between glycemic index and glycemic load values of carbohydrate rich foods.

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